Subscribe via RSS Feed Connect on Google Plus Connect on LinkedIn Connect on YouTube

Website Tracks Your Downloads from File-Sharing Sites

December 14, 2011 1 Comment

An interesting bit of tension between copyrights and privacy rights.: Youhavedownloaded.com maintains a database of IP addresses and the pirated movies they have downloaded from file-sharing sites. As reported at Securitynewsdaily.com:

To date, Youhavedownloaded has a database of more 52,286,000 users and 110,800 torrents made up of 1,918,000 individual files. A glance at the homepage shows a small sample of what people have downloaded, including the film “Spy Kids 4,” the AMC show “The Walking Dead” and season four of FX’s “Sons of Anarchy.”

The site was built as a proof-of-concept, Suren Ter-Saakov, one of its founders, told noted cybersecurity researcher Brian Krebs. As such, it stops short of parsing through “dynamic” IP addresses, which change and can be used to conceal one’s online activities. The site’s servers don’t store timestamps or gather personally identifiable details either.

The site avoids privacy violations by not providing a means of matching the recorded IP addresses with their user identities. They do provide a cute little widget that you can post on your site to let users know that you know they have pirated files via their IP:

Don’t worry, the widget does not log your IP, so only you’re aware of your misdeeds.

Share

Comments (1)

Trackback URL | Comments RSS Feed

  1. Joe says:

    Under reasons on requesting removal from that site, I posted this:
    “Privacy… And implication that it’s my IP address despite disclaimers is still libel. Privacy and presumption of innocence should be the default, not the exception!

    The terms of your agreement are illegal and thus I don’t have to agree to them. It’s essentially asking someone to admit to a crime before a newspaper will remove the accusation. Thus any such ‘agreement’ is duress and invalid.”

    It’s a bunch of movies that I never saw but it might have been another user on the modem. Without proof or at the least a notice on each search that it is inaccurate, they’re opening themselves up to libel and slander cases. Putting some ‘disclaimer’ several clicks away starting at some place out of the way of the main text just doesn’t cut it.

Leave a Reply